Total body reconditioning, muscle strengthening and increasing muscle mass

EMS has been widely used in physiotherapy for decades with great results. It’s rapidly expanding use as a Whole Body Training method providing the perfect combination of a highly effective strength and cardio training.

EMS is an efficient method to increase or maintain muscle mass, strength and function. It can also be used for preventive and rehabilitation purposes in neurology, orthopaedics, rheumatology and many other medical fields.

Total body reconditioning invoking positive effects in case of the following indications: 

  • Increasing local blood circulation [1]
  • Prevention of venous thrombosis of the calf muscles after surgery [2]
  • Prevention or retardation of disuse atrophy [3]
  • Muscle re-education [4]
  • Relaxation of muscle spasm [5]
  • Maintaining or increasing range of motion [6]

Treating medical conditions, such as:

  • Total hip arthroplasty
  • Anterior cruciate ligament
  • Total knee replacement
  • Lower back pain
  • Sarcopenia

 

Ref:

  1. Jin, H.-K., Hwang, T.-Y., Cho, S.-H., Koga, M., Nagatsuka, K., & Minematsu, K. (2017). Effect of electrical stimulation on blood flow velocity and vessel size. Open Medicine, 12(1), 89–97. https://doi. org/10.1515/med-2017-0002
  2. Ojima, M., Takegawa, R., Hirose, T., Ohni- shi, M., Shiozaki, T., & Shimazu, T. (2017). Hemodynamic effects of electrical mus- cle stimulation in the prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis for intensive care unit patients: a randomized trial. Jour- nal of Intensive Care, 5(1), 9. https://doi. org/10.1186/s40560-016-0206-8
  1. Kemmler, W., & Von Stengel, S. (2012). Alternative exercise technologies to fight against sarcopenia at old age: A series of studies and review. Journal of Aging Research, 2012(February). https://doi.org/10.1155/2012/109013
  2. You, G., Liang, H., & Yan, T. (2014). Func- tional electrical stimulation early af- ter stroke improves lower limb motor function and ability in activities of daily living. NeuroRehabilitation, 35(3), 381– 389. https://doi.org/10.3233/NRE-141129

5. Junhyuck Park et al. (2014). The Effects of Exercise with TENS on Spasticity, Bal- ance, and Gait in Patients with Chronic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Medical Science Monitor, 20, 1890–1896. https://doi.org/10.12659/MSM.890926

6. Stein, C., Fritsch, C. G., Robinson, C., Sbruzzi, G., & Plentz, R. D. M. (2015). Ef- fects of Electrical Stimulation in Spas- tic Muscles After Stroke. Stroke, 46(8), 2197–2205. https://doi.org/10.1161/ STROKEAHA.115.009633